Witticism: Science and Tech Updates

  1. Text Originally by support

    Urgent security update

    support:

    Bad news: A major vulnerability has been disclosed for the technology that powers encryption across the majority of the internet. That includes Tumblr. Our team took immediate action to fix the issue, but you should still take some time to change your password, not only here but on any other sites you visit. 

    You should also strongly consider enabling two-factor authentication. It’ll go a long way to ensure that no one besides you can access your account. Thanks, and take care.

  2. Link Originally by techspotlight

    Best of TechSpotlight 2013

    techspotlight:

    My BEST posts of 2013

    While this has been a relatively quiet year on the posting front, it’s always nice to look back and see what has piqued the interest. Thanks to all.

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    Generated using the best of tumblr tool.

  3. Link Originally by techspotlight

    2014 preview: Private internet to beat the spooks - tech - 30 December 2013 - New Scientist

    techspotlight:

    What’s the price of loss of trust? We will find out in 2014 as the after-effects of the revelations about the spying campaigns on the world’s internet and cellphone networks become apparent. The financial costs are already mounting. The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, a Washington DC think tank, reckons US firms could lose $35 billion in sales in the next two years because of fears over snooping by the US National Security Agency (NSA). The revelations might also change how we use the internet in more fundamental ways. World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee has warned that a lack of faith in privacy could make people interact less freely with one another online. But there may be some benefits, too. People are now more aware of what they do online. For example, use of DuckDuckGo, a search engine that promises not to collect a user’s personal information, soared in the weeks after the NSA’s activities were revealed. This personal data protection is likely to accelerate next year. We might also see the first signs of internet fragmentation. Some nations, including Brazil and Germany, are considering reining in internet routing to within their own borders, although such moves would play into the hands of authoritarian states and cause delays for international traffic. Other methods to beat the spooks could also hit the mainstream, including ways of masking traffic and even local internet networks that keep sensitive data off the public internet.

  4. Originally by m1ssred

    Fun with chemistry

    (Source: m1ssred, via life-on-a-cloud)

  5. Photo Originally by laughingsquid laughingsquid:

Infographic of the Origins of Common User Interface Symbols
  6. Text Originally by onthemedia

    Yes, Facebook Messenger wants access to your phone’s mic whenever it wants.

    onthemedia:

    Here’s why you shouldn’t worry. 

    (via npr)

  7. Photo Originally by laughingsquid laughingsquid:

R2D2 USB Car Charger
  8. Photo Originally by wired wired:

The price of a bitcoin topped $900 last week, an enormous surge in value that arrived amidst Congressional hearings where top U.S. financial regulators took a surprisingly rosy view of digital currency. Just 10 months ago, a bitcoin sold for a measly $13.
The spike was big news across the globe, from Washington to Tokyo to China, and it left many asking themselves: “What the hell is a bitcoin?” It’s a good question — not only for those with little understanding of the modern financial system and how it intersects with modern technology, but also for those steeped in the new internet-driven economy that has so quickly remade our world over the last 20 years.
Bitcoin is a digital currency, meaning it’s money controlled and stored entirely by computers spread across the internet, and this money is finding its way to more and more people and businesses around the world. But it’s much more than that, and many people — including the sharpest of internet pioneers as well as seasoned economists — are still struggling to come to terms with its many identities.
With that in mind, we give you this: an idiot’s guide to bitcoin. And there’s no shame in reading. Nowadays, as bitcoin is just beginning to show what it’s capable of, we’re all neophytes.
[MORE: The Bitcoin Survival Guide - Everything You Need to Know About the Future of Money]

    wired:

    The price of a bitcoin topped $900 last week, an enormous surge in value that arrived amidst Congressional hearings where top U.S. financial regulators took a surprisingly rosy view of digital currency. Just 10 months ago, a bitcoin sold for a measly $13.

    The spike was big news across the globe, from Washington to Tokyo to China, and it left many asking themselves: “What the hell is a bitcoin?” It’s a good question — not only for those with little understanding of the modern financial system and how it intersects with modern technology, but also for those steeped in the new internet-driven economy that has so quickly remade our world over the last 20 years.

    Bitcoin is a digital currency, meaning it’s money controlled and stored entirely by computers spread across the internet, and this money is finding its way to more and more people and businesses around the world. But it’s much more than that, and many people — including the sharpest of internet pioneers as well as seasoned economists — are still struggling to come to terms with its many identities.

    With that in mind, we give you this: an idiot’s guide to bitcoin. And there’s no shame in reading. Nowadays, as bitcoin is just beginning to show what it’s capable of, we’re all neophytes.

    [MORE: The Bitcoin Survival Guide - Everything You Need to Know About the Future of Money]

    (via techspotlight)

  9. Photo Originally by techspotlight techspotlight:

This week-end, visitors of the London Science Museum can trek through the un-natural habitats of robots inspired by nature, interacting with creatures that swim, flap, and crawl, in a unique safari experience. “Visitors to this exhibition called Robot SafariEU will see not just how nature can inspire innovative robotic designs, but also how these biomimetic robots are actually advancing our understanding of the animals and plants they mimic,” explains Nicola Burghall, Content Developer for Robot SafariEU. “We’re very excited to be able to showcase some of the latest European biomimetic robotics research here at the Science Museum.” EPFL roboticists at the Biorob laboratory designed some of the models presented at the Safari, namely the Cheetah-cub and a family of salamanders. These electronic creatures are used to study the nervous system, and in the long-run, to help develop therapies for spinal cord injuries and better prostheses for amputees. (via EPFL in the Depths of London’s Robot Jungle)

    techspotlight:

    This week-end, visitors of the London Science Museum can trek through the un-natural habitats of robots inspired by nature, interacting with creatures that swim, flap, and crawl, in a unique safari experience. “Visitors to this exhibition called Robot SafariEU will see not just how nature can inspire innovative robotic designs, but also how these biomimetic robots are actually advancing our understanding of the animals and plants they mimic,” explains Nicola Burghall, Content Developer for Robot SafariEU. “We’re very excited to be able to showcase some of the latest European biomimetic robotics research here at the Science Museum.” EPFL roboticists at the Biorob laboratory designed some of the models presented at the Safari, namely the Cheetah-cub and a family of salamanders. These electronic creatures are used to study the nervous system, and in the long-run, to help develop therapies for spinal cord injuries and better prostheses for amputees. (via EPFL in the Depths of London’s Robot Jungle)

  10. Photo Originally by techspotlight techspotlight:

By making the basic building blocks of batteries out of ink, Harvard materials scientist Jennifer Lewis is laying the groundwork for lithium-ion batteries and other high-performing electronics that can be produced with 3-D printers.Although the technology is still at an early stage, the ability to print batteries and other electronics could make it possible to manufacture new kinds of devices. Think of self-powered biomedical sensors, affixed to the skin, that would continuously transmit vital signs to a smartphone. Or existing products could be made more simply and efficiently.For example, the plastic shell of a hearing aid is already 3-D printed for a custom fit inside a wearer’s ear. But the electronics are manufactured separately, and the batteries are often the type that must be replaced frequently. If the electronics and a rechargeable battery were printed together, the final product could be made more rapidly and seamlessly. (via Lithium-ion Batteries, Straight From a 3-D Printer | MIT Technology Review)

    techspotlight:

    By making the basic building blocks of batteries out of ink, Harvard materials scientist Jennifer Lewis is laying the groundwork for lithium-ion batteries and other high-performing electronics that can be produced with 3-D printers.Although the technology is still at an early stage, the ability to print batteries and other electronics could make it possible to manufacture new kinds of devices. Think of self-powered biomedical sensors, affixed to the skin, that would continuously transmit vital signs to a smartphone. Or existing products could be made more simply and efficiently.For example, the plastic shell of a hearing aid is already 3-D printed for a custom fit inside a wearer’s ear. But the electronics are manufactured separately, and the batteries are often the type that must be replaced frequently. If the electronics and a rechargeable battery were printed together, the final product could be made more rapidly and seamlessly. (via Lithium-ion Batteries, Straight From a 3-D Printer | MIT Technology Review)

PortraitTechnology...,

when misused, poisons air, soil, water and lives. But a world without technology would be prey to something worse: the impersonal ruthlessness of the natural order, in which the health of a species depends on relentless sacrifice of the weak.
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